Description for Category, better for SEO purpose

Scriptures and Fury: The Yoruba Sango and Jesus in Judgement

, , ,

‘The Yoruba Sango and Jesus in Judgement’ explores tropes of power in human relations, especially as these help our understanding towards comparative scriptures—in the things that scriptures do, are made to do/are used to do, rather than what they mean à la Vincent L. Wimbush, scholar of Religion and Director Institute for Signifying Scriptures  (Theorizing Scriptures). Persons and communities often arm and equip themselves with what they consider to be divinely-inspired explanations of the supernatural origins and ownership of their “owned scripture.” Subsequently, as psycho-political instruments, users of scriptures activate and deploy same in socio-cultural contexts in order to allow scriptures do stuff for them, not merely as conduits of hermeneutics; after all, messages from the gods require a messenger to deliver them.

This paper uses the theme of fury from two cultures—ancient-contemporary Yoruba and first-century Christianity, in juxtaposition with the deployment and use of anger, threat, and punishment in the US Presidency of Donald Trump—to examine scripture as an Anglo-freighted concept for the imaginaries of power and privilege, or as a response to both power and privilege.

First of all, who is Sango, and what is his connection with fury? How does establishment of a Sango-fury nexus help our definitions in Religious Studies? Does engaging these subjects—Sango, fury, and scripture—help us in understanding Donald Trump as a Christian and politician: a businessman sui generis? Therefore, this paper is preoccupied with providing responses to the above issues, questions, and concerns, in relation to the use of scripture in a power forge.

Signup for updates

Reading Scripture in the New American Age of Donald J. Trump

, , ,

Uploading soon…

Signup for updates

“President” Oprah Winfrey Takes Charge, Pushes the Button

, ,
The power of the television in shaping thinking in America yet again came alive on Sunday evening when what began as an ordinary event gave birth to a chorus: Oprah for president. The “sacred” seat of the American president is one of awe and wonder. Those who sit in that position may not fully understand that until they are unseated, whether naturally, tenure expiration or by popular demand.
On the 7th day of January 2018, billionaire media mogul, Oprah Winfrey, became the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. de Mille Award. Below are the full transcripts of her speech during the Golden Globes 2018. In her acceptance speech, which many see as a political statement towards a foreseeable presidential ambition, Oprah made statements that resonated with Americans on several levels. While there is not an iota of doubt that Oprah is an influencer in her general and will be for a long time to come, there are arguments as to whether she understands what it means or takes to be a president of the United States.
It is interesting that Americans are one of the finest producers of scriptures on earth. Loving religiousness and its politics, America presents the study of religion with endless opportunities for exploring the terror and grip of belief upon the human psyche. But, no other time presents a better chance than now to examine where the birth of a nation may lead!

Read more

American Heritage through the Lens and Mobilities of Confederate Icons

, , , , , ,

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa.

Why Comparative Heritage is Important

, , ,

The reasons why “Comparative Heritage” is important are not immediately obvious, and for obvious reasons, too.  First, nearly everyone feels comfortable talking about the positive and nice sides about their history.  And again, that happens too often, for obvious reasons.  Conversations around “heritage” often always assume a monotonous definition about some distant past, woven around the fine memories of the heritage inheritors.  It feels like talking some nice things about an ancestor.   Or, in another way, with “heritage,” one might assume that by that is meant our collective memory of the past, and how those moments past had shaped (us into) the present. These are ways, but not the only ones, of looking at heritage.

Fundamentally, Comparative Heritage (CHER) transitioned from Living Effective Heritage, to accomodate some critical reflections and thought-provoking conversations on “what is often implied, meant, done, unsaid/stated with heritage.”

Read more